Increasing Your Running Cadence: Everything You Need to Know

One of the most essential running tips for beginners: learning how to increase your running cadence. If you struggle with chronic injuries during training or want to get faster or run farther, improving your running cadence is a game changing strategy. These tips are essential for runners of any kind! #runningcadence #runningtips #increasecadence

My running journey began in a rather conventional way. Someone I know had gotten a burst of motivation, wanted to make a change, and signed up for a half marathon. Along the way they recruited some family members, and I jumped at the chance to tag along. I completed the miles on my training plan, never giving much of a second thought to injury prevention or cross training.

I had no knowledge of a running cadence, nor any desire to learn.

I started running more frequently, running longer distances, and looking for future races. But after finishing my first marathon I found myself unable to bend my right leg the following day. Unsure what was happening, I desperately tried to run through the pain until I finally ended up in physical therapy.

Related: How to Overcome Common Causes of Running Pain

Thus began my journey with chronic running injuries.

From this point on, I struggled with injuries throughout my training. I wound up in physical therapy two times in one year, spending 6 months of that year completing strengthening exercises with my doctor. I couldn’t figure out what I was doing wrong – I ran consistently, took rest days, and stretched after every run.

What was I missing?

I finally started to take PT seriously the second time around. This time made me realize that if I didn’t change anything I might end up injured after every single race. I learned what a running cadence was, what the ideal cadence is, and how to increase your running cadence.

With a little due diligence and patience, I increased my running cadence.

This simple change to my running technique has allowed me to remain injury free for the past five years. Improving my running cadence has seen me through 6 marathons, 18 half marathons, and everything in between without injury.

One of the most essential running tips for beginners: learning how to increase your running cadence. If you struggle with chronic injuries during training or want to get faster or run farther, improving your running cadence is a game changing strategy. These tips are essential for runners of any kind! #runningcadence #runningtips #increasecadence

How to Increase Your Running Cadence

It turns out that increasing your cadence is a miracle worker for preventing injury and helping increase your speed. Whether or not you struggle with the occasional runner’s knee, chronic injuries, or are just wanting to improve, every runner can benefit from perfecting their cadence.

What is a running cadence?

The term “running cadence” refers to the number of times your feet strike the ground in one minute. Your cadence is the total strikes between both feet and is measured in beats per minute.

A common misconception that new runners have is that a higher cadence equates to a faster runner. While a higher cadence does mean that the runner is striking the ground more often, it doesn’t necessarily mean that they are running faster. Depending on the length of your stride, your feet may come in contact with the ground very frequently or infrequently.

What is the “perfect” running cadence?

An ideal running cadence is 180 beats per minute.

This means that your feet come in contact with the ground 180 times each minute (90 strikes with your right foot, and 90 strikes with your left).

Determining your running cadence by counting your steps is nearly impossible, but luckily there are many tools we can use to easily discover and improve our running cadence. One of my favorites: a simple metronome app.

There are many free metronome apps on your phone, which you can download and use throughout your run. A metronome allows you to set the tempo to a variety of different speeds, and then gives you a consistent click at your designated tempo.

How do you increase your cadence using a metronome?

Since the ideal running cadence is 180 bpm, setting your metronome to 180 will give you a click each time your foot should strike the ground. You’ll want to start the metronome at the beginning of your run, and continue playing throughout. You can play the metronome out loud or through headphones while you run.

For the most accurate results, you’ll want to spend the first few weeks running only on the treadmill. Running on the treadmill prevents you from accidentally lengthening your stride and speeding up when you first increase your cadence.

One of the most essential running tips for beginners: learning how to increase your running cadence. If you struggle with chronic injuries during training or want to get faster or run farther, improving your running cadence is a game changing strategy. These tips are essential for runners of any kind! #runningcadence #runningtips #increasecadence

Set the treadmill speed to your normal pace, start your metronome, and get running. During your run, aim to match your foot strike with the clicks from the metronome. One foot should strike the ground each time you hear a click.

Working to improve your running cadence can feel quite tedious, especially during those first few runs. If you’re like most runners, your cadence is likely significantly lower than 150. You’re probably taking longer strides than are ideal at your pace, which will require a bit of patience and diligent work as you begin increasing your cadence.

Related: How to Break Through a Running Plateau

Start with just a short run each time, focusing on matching each step with the click of the metronome. You’ll likely be shortening your stride to maintain pace with the new cadence. After a week or so of successfully running in time with the metronome, take your runs outdoors and continue using the metronome.

It may take a while before your body adjust to this new running cadence, but once it does you’ll be able to run with a cadence of 180 without even thinking about it. The stride length and pace will feel completely normal.

When I began, my running cadence was around 150 bpm.

One of the most essential running tips for beginners: learning how to increase your running cadence. If you struggle with chronic injuries during training or want to get faster or run farther, improving your running cadence is a game changing strategy. These tips are essential for runners of any kind! #runningcadence #runningtips #increasecadence

This was ridiculously low! Getting up to 180 took quite a bit of work, but after a few weeks I finally got the hang of it. Once it started to feel more natural I let myself run outside, keeping the metronome going in my headphones and focusing on shortening my stride and increasing my turnover.

Don’t get me wrong, it took quite a bit of work to get there. The runs were tedious, I got bored and often wanted to give up. But once I got started I could tell I was on to something – my muscles were much less tight after each run and my feet didn’t hurt at all. After years of struggling, my chronic running injuries were beginning to fade away.

Related: What to Know When Achieving Your Goals Feels Out of Reach

Taking the time to improve your running cadence may feel like a tedious task, but spending the time focusing on this running technique now will pay off leaps and bounds in the future. This shorter stride will help you avoid heel striking and over-striding, two common causes of running injuries.

Your increased turnover will help you run faster with less work and keep you running strong in the long run. If there is one running technique that every runner should know, whether they’re an elite or beginner, it’s how to determine and improve their running cadence.

Happy running!

Further Reading:

Changing Cadence Cure for Chronic Running Injuries

Changing Cadence Cure for Chronic Running Injuries

Changing Cadence Cure for Chronic Running Injuries

15 comments / Add your comment below

  1. I downloaded a playlist with 180bpm songs, it is quite easy to get in sync with the music rhythm, I did find out myself taking shorter faster steps. Definitely less impact on the joints, great tip!

    1. That’s awesome, I’m so glad you found this helpful! Running to music with the same beat is a great way to do this, I hope it helps!

  2. Awesome, as a physio, I use this a lot for runnings with results similar to yours. Well done sticking ay it.
    As you have found, after some time no metronome is needed as your bodies natural rhythm is retrained!

    1. Thank you! It was so tedious when I first started but I am so glad I stuck with it. I never would have thought something so simple could affect my running so greatly. Thanks for reading!

  3. 100% agree, I had the same experience. I got an injury while training for a half marathon and my physio said the same thing. Since upping my cadence I haven’t been injured. It’s so important, so great post!

    1. I’m glad it wasn’t just me! I had never even thought of my cadence until I was forced to. It’s so strange how the littlest things have the greatest impact on our running. Thanks for reading! 🙂

  4. What a great post; I’ve never thought of the idea of a perfect (or near perfect) cadence. It makes sense. Perhaps, I will look more into this, while training for my next half-marathon.

    1. Thank you! I never used to think about my cadence at all until I was forced to, but I’m sure glad it did! It was a relatively easy thing to change too, which was great. Let me know how it goes if you decide to try it!

      1. LOL, I tried to determine my cadence number by counting how many times my left foot touched the ground in one minute (at the beginning of my run). I got the number multiplied it by two, but I forgot the number by the time I finished my workout. However, I do remember that it was below 180. I guess that I gotta try it again this weekend.

      2. Haha, the struggle to determine cadence is real! I have definitely attempted to count my steps as well. It’s harder than it sounds, lol! I finally gave up and downloaded a metronome app so I could set it to my goal and just match my steps to it. It was a lot less work than counting 😉

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